Scoops Measure Volume, Not Weight: A Reminder from Dr. Getty

Newsdate: Fri 31 October 2014 - 07:20 am

The directions on most feed bags offer guidelines in terms of the number of pounds (or kg) you should feed. If you use a scoop to measure your horse’s feed, how many pounds are you actually feeding? Are you assuming that a 2-quart scoop, for example, offers 2 pounds (0.9 kg) of feed? This can be a dangerous assumption.

Measuring horse's feed accurately

Measuring horse's feed accurately

...since the stomach is relatively small, it can only process a small amount of food at a time, so supplemental meal size should be limited to no more than 4 lbs (1.8 kg) for an 1100 lb (500 kg) horse.

Scoops provide volume; they measure quarts or liters; they tell you nothing about weight. Even those scoops that offer weight measurements on the outside are estimates at best, because it depends on what you put in the scoop that determines the weight.

One quart of marbles is going to weigh more than one quart of cotton balls. By the same analogy, one quart of oats is going to weigh more than one quart of shredded beet pulp.

Knowing how much you are feeding is important for several reasons. First, your horse can potentially become obese from too many calories. Second, since the stomach is relatively small, it can only process a small amount of food at a time, so supplemental meal size should be limited to no more than 4 lbs (1.8 kg) for an 1100 lb (500 kg) horse.

Finally, following the manufacturer’s directions is the best way to ensure that your horse is getting all of the vitamins and minerals listed on the label, otherwise additional supplementation will be important, and the only way to follow manufacturer’s directions is to weigh the feed.   

A scale is a must-have piece of equipment for any barn. Weigh your feed and mark your scoop so you do not have to weigh it each time you feed. If you change feeds, be sure to weigh the new feed; do not rely on the previous measurement.

About Dr. Getty

Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. is an internationally respected, independent equine nutritionist who believes that optimizing horse health comes from understanding how the horse’s physiology and instincts determine the correct feeding and nutrition practices. She is available for private consultations and speaking engagements.

Dr. Getty’s comprehensive resource book, Feed Your Horse Like a Horse, is available at Dr. Getty’s website, www.gettyequinenutrition.com, as well as from Amazon (www.Amazon.com) and other online book retailers. The seven separate volumes in Dr. Getty’s topic-centered “Spotlight on Equine Nutrition” series are also available at her website, where Dr. Getty offers special package pricing, and from Amazon (in print and Kindle versions) and from other online retailers.

Dr. Getty’s website, www.gettyequinenutrition.com, offers a generous stock of free, useful information for the horse person. Sign up for her free monthly newsletter, Forage for Thought; browse her library of reference articles; search her nutrition forum; and purchase recordings of her educational teleseminars. Reach Dr. Getty at gettyequinenutrition@gmail.com.

By: Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D.

About the Author

Flossie Sellers

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As an animal lover since childhood, Flossie was delighted when Mark, the CEO and developer of EquiMed asked her to join his team of contributors.

She enrolled in My Horse University at Michigan State and completed a number of courses in everything related to horse health, nutrition, diseases and conditions, medications, hoof and dental care, barn safety, and first aid.

Staying up-to-date on the latest developments in horse care and equine health is now a habit, and she enjoys sharing a wealth of information with horse owners everywhere.

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